#2069 | Wednesday, September 11th 2002
I was on board Aer Lingus flight from Dublin to Los Angeles with my husband for my honeymoon when the WTC was attacked.

I will never forget the moment when the Pilot came over the speaking saying 'Ladies and Gentleman, I have some very bad news. The US has closed it's airspace, and we have been ordered to turn the plane around and return to Dublin. As soon as we have any further information, we will let you know.' The stewards and captain came around the plane speaking to the passengers, but were saying very little about what had actually happened. They said that some planes had been hijacked and had dive bombed the Pentagon. It wasn't until 4 hours later (7pm GMT) when we landed back at Dublin that the captain announced what had really happened. Quite rightly in my opinion, they had kept quiet about the full extent of the atroticites until we were back on the ground otherwise there could have been a panic.

It didn't sink in for me until a few hours later, when we finally found somewhere to stay for the night. I turned the TV on and just stood dumbfounded. it was like watching a disaster movie. I cried and cried like I hadn't done for years.

My heart and prayers go out to everyone who lost someone on that dreadful day. I will never forget it.

Emma | 26 | United Kingdom

#1987 | Tuesday, September 10th 2002
I remember coming home form taking my 5 year old daughter to school, my husband a Fireman at the time called and asked me to turn on the telivision. Of course as soon as I did so I dropped to my knees in horror. The first plane had just hit the tower, then right before my eyes the second one. I stood there not knowing what to say or what to do. I couldn't for the life of me begin to imagine what was going on. Then when it was announced that it was an act of terrorism, I felt angered. I remember feeling as if I was lost in a room that went on forever. I am only 26, but I knew what was going on. To this day I still shudder, and ask why. My heart goes out so deeply to those who were lost, and those who lost. My patriotism has never been stronger, evn one year later. I truley understand what it means to say I AM PROUD TO BE AN AMERICAN!! I will forever remember and long for the terrorist to be certain, They didn't break America, all they achieved was unity that can not be matched.
Jennifer Compton | 26 | South Carolina

#1984 | Tuesday, September 10th 2002
I was at work for Liberty Mutual, one company involved in ensuring the safety of workers involved in the World Trade Center cleanup after Sept 11th. My co-workers and I spent much of the day trying to find out what was going on. With the flood of users trying to access various online news sites, we were unable to reach any sites. We felt lost and confused with no information, and a lot of fear.


A friend worked at a radio station, and he was feeding us information from the AP newswire, but there was so little to learn, and so much left unknown. What little we learned shocked and scared us - we didn't know what was happening next and where. We are in a town north of Boston where there is a nuclear power plant and nuclear submarines - in the uncertainty of what was happening that day, we wondered if we could be targets. We feared for friends and family and anyone we knew who couldn't be accounted for.


The images and information that finally got to us via the internet, mass e-mail chains, television news programs, and even just the faces and sites around us were stunning and heart wrenching.


That night, like many Americans, helpless to find any other way to express my feelings about the day, I hung a large American flag in my front window. For weeks, candles were lit each night in front of that flag - reflections of my hope and prayers for those survivors we were sure would be found. The flag and those candles are still there, and will remain. They will be lit again tomorrow night and those feelings that had subsided will come back. It's a grief unlike any other because it is shared by millions.

Paige | 26 | New Hampshire

#1967 | Tuesday, September 10th 2002
MY NAME IS PFC ROBERT SCHWARTZ,IM STATIONED WITH THE 1ST SQUADRON, 4TH U.S CAVALRY IN GERMANY.I STILL REMEMBER THE DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL...SITTING, WATCHING THE NEWS AS THE TOWERS CAME DOWN, KNOWING THAT THERE WERE STILL NUMEROUS PEOPLE AROUND THE AREA.WE WERE TOLD TO GET READY.BEING THE MOST COMBAT READY UNIT IN EUROPE WE THOUGHT WE WERE CALLED OUT.TALKING TO MY WIFE BACK IN THE STATES ON THE PHONE,DEALING WITH ALL THE CONFUSION.OUR PRAYERS ARE FOREVER WITH THE FAMILYS.WE STAND FOR FREEDOM...SOMETHING NO ONE COULD EVER CHANGE.GOD BLESS AMERICA..GOD BLESS THE "BROTHERS IN ARMS".
ROB SCHWARTZ | 26 | Germany

#1827 | Monday, September 9th 2002
I recall the light streaming into my room. It was my day off and I lazily shuffled my feet to the bathroom to put my contacts in. On the other side of the bathroom wall rested the TV. I heard people screaming and I came around the corner to see my two roommates sitting in the chair in disbelief. One was crying as the other held her close, tears running down their face as well. "We're being attacked," was all one could muster as I tried to understand what was happening. I saw the smoke rising from the World Trade Center Tower and recalled the bomb that happened there some time before. "There's a bomb or something?", was my question to them as the newscaster said, "Let's show this video." It was then that everything slowed down for me, I watched as this plane seared into this building and felt my breath leave me. I couldn't speak, I couldn't do anything. I remember rage coursing through me the same time that the child in me screamed for it's mother. In that moment of feelings the second building was struck and reports of the Pentagon began rising in the news. I felt litterally under attack. These people were finding places of importance to strike and kill who was to say I wasn't next door to the next place on their list? Even still as the memorial comes around I wonder if they would do the same again. Fear rested in me for close to three months. Afraid to go away too long, refusing business trips and being with my family and friends every moment I could. I am too young to ever know how a nation felt with JFK's assasination I often never understood it. The loss of a leader is hard but so many still hold that day close to their hearts. I understand now how they feel.....I unfortunatly understand all too well.

"May you find serenity in the silence of peace, for the silence will be broken and the peace shattered by chaos. Yet within chaos, peace follows it's suit and so the healing will begin and the world shall turn another day."

Cindy Rockwell | 26 | Florida

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